Keynotes and Seminars

Keynote Speeches


Why She Buys: How to Grow Your Business with Women Consumers
The Top 10 Trends in Marketing and Selling to Women
The Seven Deadly Sins of Selling to Women
How to Grow Your Business with Women Clients (Business-to-Business Audiences)
Marketing to Millennial Women
Delivering Customer Service with Female Appeal
He Said, She Said, Who Said What?

Why She Buys: How to Grow Your Business with Women Consumers

Women are the engine of the global economy and buy nearly 80% of all consumer products. They hold the purse strings, and when they’ve got a tight grip on them as they do now, companies must be shrewder than ever to win them over. Gender is the most powerful determinant of how a person views the world, and everything in it. While there are mountains of research done every year segmenting consumers and analyzing why they buy, more often than not, it doesn't factor in the one piece of information that trumps them all: the sex of the buyer. In a lively presentation based on her acclaimed book (called “essential reading” by The Wall Street Journal), Brennan educates audiences on the fundamentals of gender psychology, and the global trends driving women’s purchasing decisions. She provides a roadmap for businesses on how to evaluate sales, marketing, branding and product design from a female perspective. Topics include:

  • The most important trends driving women's purchasing patterns
  • How to craft a marketing strategy through a female lens
  • The key to appealing to women without alienating men
  • How to drive an emotional connection to your brand
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The Top 10 Trends in Marketing and Selling to Women

The world is changing fast. Businesses need to stay current or risk getting left behind. How can you ensure that your business stays relevant with women consumers? In this enlightening presentation, Bridget Brennan distills the most important trends driving women consumers and offers techniques for breaking through the clutter. Audiences will learn how to capture the attention of women consumers, drive brand preference and increase sales by understanding how and why their needs have evolved. The trends covered in this presentation provide a critical roadmap for short and long-range planning. At a time when every company is looking for a competitive advantage, executives will benefit from this "real time" information and techniques for increasing both market share and mindshare with women consumers. Topics include:

  • The most important trends driving women's purchasing patterns
  • The global and cultural climate of the female population
  • Insights on Millennial women’s consumer behavior
  • How to see your business through a female lens
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The Seven Deadly Sins of Selling to Women

No matter how many times a woman sees an ad, or how much research she’s conducted online, the critical purchasing moment often comes down to that "last three feet of the sale." This is when she’s standing in front of a shelf or talking directly to a salesperson, trying to decide what to buy. It’s in this moment that mistakes are frequently made and sales are lost, simply because women have different expectations of the sales process than men do. In this session, Brennan teaches audiences how women make purchasing decisions and respond to sales pitches and retail environments. Participants learn female-focused techniques to help increase closing rates. This presentation is also available in a business-to-business module. Topics include:

  • How women view the sales process differently from men, and what this means to your sales pitch
  • How to develop appropriate body language and eye contact techniques
  • Follow-up methods that resonate with women buyers
  • How to leverage service as your most powerful advantage
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How to Grow Your Business with Women Clients
(Business-to-Business Audiences)

Women are not only the world's most powerful consumers, they are also increasingly the decision-makers for businesses. This means sales executives are calling on women clients more than ever before, especially in industries that just a few decades ago were overwhelmingly male dominated. In a highly practical and thought-provoking presentation, Bridget Brennan educates sales representatives and client service executives (of both genders) on relationship-building skills that increase their ability to earn the trust and business of women buyers. Brennan approaches the subject with the philosophy that women are females first and clients second, and that understanding female culture sets the foundation for success in creating win-win client relationships. In How to Grow Your Business with Women Clients, participants learn:

  • Techniques for instilling buyers' confidence in your expertise
  • Strategic small-talk strategies that make a big impact
  • How to inspire clients to buy from you
  • Monday morning strategies that can be implemented immediately
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Marketing to Milllennial Women

What are the most powerful marketing techniques for reaching Millennial women, the influential generation of consumers who were born between 1980 and 2000? In this engaging presentation, Brennan provides insights on this crucial target audience, who are already the newest generation of mothers. The 30’s are also an age when many women hit their professional stride. This combination of factors means Millennial women are a prime target audience for everything from cars to furniture to financial services. As a generation that's come of age with social media and technology, what’s the best way to reach them? Brennan explores how the Millennial generation’s unique perception of the world (and themselves) impact brand preferences, marketing responses and choice of sales channel. Attendees will learn the cultural forces that have shaped Millennial women, and how to apply this knowledge to marketing and sales efforts. Topics include:

  • How the mass documentation of Millennials' lives impacts brand choice
  • What kind of parenting style is already being exhibited by the new generation of mothers, and what this means to consumer purchasing
  • Why inspiration is a crucial component for this age group
  • How expectations for the sales experience are changing
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Delivering Customer Service with Female Appeal

Customer service is often forgotten in the thrill of the hunt for customers. Once a customer is snagged, the wooing is over and the relationship – in the form of customer loyalty – often fizzles out. Rants about poor customer service fill conversations everywhere, and the Web has helped make these feelings public. The fact that customer service is a consumer hot button also makes it a major opportunity for differentiation. In their role as “Chief Purchasing Officers” of the home, women interact with customer-service personnel more than anyone else. In this lively session, participants will learn how to implement customer-service policies and techniques with female appeal. Topics covered include:

  • How women's notions of fairness impact their view of the customer-service experience
  • The psychology behind the white-hot rage generated by automation and voice-recognition systems
  • Why it's not what you say, it's how you say it
  • Why customer service is simply marketing in disguise
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He Said, She Said, Who Said What?

Gender Communication in the Workplace (Diversity Issue)

In this enlightening presentation, Brennan discusses the most common differences in male and female communication styles at work. Audiences will learn valuable techniques for making themselves better understood to co-workers, bosses and subordinates of the opposite gender. The goal of the session is to help bridge the gender gap at the office and achieve better workplace harmony. A special emphasis is placed on the language of performance reviews. These sessions achieve the best results when both men and women are in attendance. Topics covered include:

  • When NOT to say you're sorry
  • Simple techniques for using more direct speech
  • Why the ability to accept compliments is critical to a career
  • Why it's okay to say "I" instead of "We"

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